Where to get support

If you or someone you know needs support, there is help available:

0800 027 1234

Scotland’s Domestic Abuse Helpline

To speak to trained helpline workers’ 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Anyone can call the helpline. They will help you regardless of age, gender, disability, sexual orientation, nationality or background.

999

Police Emergency

To report immediate danger of harm

101

Local Police

For non-emergency police contact

0800 027 1234

Scotland’s Domestic Abuse Helpline

To speak to trained helpline workers’ 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Anyone can call the helpline. They will help you regardless of age, gender, disability, sexual orientation, nationality or background.

What happens when you call the helpline?

  • Firstly, you’ll be given some recorded information about the helpline.
  • You will then be given two options – press 1 if you are a woman or calling on behalf of a woman or press 2 if you are a man or calling on behalf of a man.
  • At busy times, you’ll have the option to leave a voicemail or hold the line.
  • If you leave a voicemail, you’ll be called back within two hours or as near as possible to another time you have requested.
  • All emails to the helpline will be answered as soon as possible and within a maximum of two days.
  • Your call will always be answered by a helpline worker who understands the dynamics of domestic abuse and forced marriage.
  • Helpline workers will listen and work to understand your concerns. They will provide you with relevant information and support.
  • You will always be treated fairly and respectfully; the helpline provides a confidential, sensitive service.
  • If English is not your first language, we can speak to you through a confidential translation service.

For safety, we need express permission from an individual in order for us to call them; we do not accept requests to call a third party. If you are concerned about a friend, family member etc. you can pass on our details so the individual can make contact with us themselves. You are also welcome to call us yourself to discuss your concerns.

Call 0800 027 1234
or visit sdafmh.org.uk

You can call Scotland’s Domestic Abuse Helpline 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

999

Police Emergency

To report immediate danger of harm

101

Local Police

For non-emergency police contact

Call 999 in case of an emergency

Call 101 for non-emergency police contact

You can call the police 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

What happens when you speak to the police?

The police will help and protect you when you report domestic abuse.

They will:

  • put you in touch with a specially-trained domestic abuse officer and support agencies
  • help you feel safe – taking you to a refuge, or making your own home secure
  • get you medical treatment if you’re injured

The police will need to gather the details of your story and investigate fully.

They will:

  • interview you – you can ask for a female or male officer
  • detain your partner/ex-partner, interviewing them if a crime is established
  • advise you on your next steps – and what’s happening with your partner/ex-partner
  • with your permission, refer you to local aid services for practical and emotional support

With enough evidence, the police will arrest your partner/ex-partner.

If it’s likely your case will result in criminal charges, you’ll be introduced to a Victim Information and Advice (VIA) officer who will:

  • keep you updated on the progress of your case
  • give you information about the criminal justice system
  • tell you what steps have been taken to protect you
  • put you in touch with support organisations who can help you

Tell the police immediately if you feel you’re being harassed or intimidated for having reported domestic abuse.

Support in court

If you’re asked to give court evidence, you’ll be entitled to special measures like:

  • giving evidence via a live TV link
  • screens which stop you having to see someone else involved in the case
  • a supporter staying with you while you give evidence

You can ask for information about your case at any point.
You have rights to support, information and advice at all stages of the criminal justice system – from reporting the crime to going to court.

Can I drop charges at a later date?

No. Once the details of the crime have been passed to the Procurator Fiscal, it’s up to them to decide whether to proceed with the case. You can let the Procurator Fiscal know if you have any concerns.

You can also call these specialist numbers:

0808 800 0024

Abused Men in Scotland (AMIS)

National helpline to support abused men

08088 01 03 02

Rape Crisis Scotland

Support for anyone affected by sexual violence

0300 999 5428

LGBT Youth Scotland

Help for LGBT people experiencing abuse

0131 624 7266

Fearless

Support for victims of domestic abuse who identify as male or from the LGBT+ Community

0800 83 85 87

Breathing Space

Helpline for people feeling down or depressed

0800 5999 247

Karma Nirvana

Support for victims of domestic abuse, forced marriage and honour based abuse

0141 353 0859

Hemat Gryffe

Support for Asian, black and minority ethnic women

0131 475 2399

SHAKTI Women’s Aid

Help for black minority ethnic (BME) women

Download this leaflet with sources of help:

Download sources of help

 

How can I help somebody else?

If someone has confided in you that they’re experiencing domestic abuse, or you suspect that someone might be suffering, it’s important not to ignore it.

Here are some ways you can help:

  • Call Scotland’s Domestic Abuse Helpline on 0800 027 1234.
  • Listen without blaming. There are many women and men in the same situation.
  • It takes trust to share experience of abuse. Don’t push them for details if they’re not ready.
  • Acknowledge they are in a frightening and difficult situation.
  • Tell them no one deserves to be threatened or beaten, despite what their abuser has said.
  • Encourage them to express their feelings.
  • Allow them to make their own decisions – don’t tell them to leave the relationship if they’re not ready.
  • If they have suffered physical harm, accompany them to get medical assistance.
  • Help them report any assaults to the police, if they so choose.
  • Be ready to share the support contacts above.
  • If they don’t already know, tell them the law has changed to include coercive and controlling behaviour.

Helping someone leave an abusive relationship:

  • Let them create their own boundaries of what is safe and unsafe.
  • Offer them the use of your home and/or phone number to leave info and messages.
  • Offer to look after an emergency bag, if they want this.
  • Do not put yourself in a dangerous situation e.g. offering to talk to the abuser.

Are you hurting the one you love? – how to get help

Have you been violent or abusive? Do you think you have a problem controlling your anger with your partner? If you are an abuser or have abused in the past and recognise that in order to change your behaviour you need help there are services available.

The following organisations may be able to assist you:

0808 802 4040

Respect

A helpline for anyone concerned about their violence and/or abuse towards a partner or ex-partner

0800 83 85 87

Breathing Space

Helpline for people feeling down or depressed